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1 at-one-ment, the conclusion

We held the door open for a miracle, but none came. At least not in the hoped-for form. That?s the thing with miracles, they don?t necessarily obey orders.

I meant to ask David if there was a significance to the director?s chair in the pathway to the front door. I don?t remember if it was there when I arrived in the afternoon yesterday. I do remember stepping around it on the way to my car at 11:30 last night. It seemed a little like the cup for Elijah. But who were we waiting for? Leila to come back and sit on it?

I last saw her last week, on Thursday. The day the miracle workers came. The day of anointments. On Friday she was supposed to go home, to begin hospice. I got a message from someone that she would be staying in the hospital through Monday. That she wanted some time to absorb what had happened during the healings. Especially that last one with the monk, where he?d wrapped her in the mantle of a modern saint, crossed her forehead, eyes, cheeks, throat, and heart with sacred oils, prayed over her for 35 minutes in four languages.

I heard she wanted things to be all set up and ready for her. That she needed to rest and didn?t want visitors. I called her home and left a message to let her know I was aware of the schedule and thinking of her. So I was surprised when the phone rang Saturday morning and it was her.

I was almost out the door, with the grandparents, and Scott and Jonah, all of us bundled up and ready to head out to Tilden Park to ride the Steam Train. Leila was talking slowly, as she has done now for weeks, what with all the narcotics and the exhaustion of illness. She informed me she?d come home because the insurance wouldn?t cover her hospital stay anymore. They don?t have a line item for rest and contemplation.

I told her I was glad she was home and that I had to go. That I would talk to her later. How many times I?ve said that in these last six weeks of rollercoastering in and out of hospitals, towards and away from the brink of death? Why did I need to be so many other places? There simply is never enough time, never enough ?laters.?

Sunday morning I called and left another message. I wanted to get her blog passwords, so I could use a service that turns blogs into books, for the kids. A few minutes later, she called. But not necessarily because I had called. One of those crossed wires moments. She fumbled who she was calling at first. ?Johnny?? ? ?Julie,? I reminded her.

The hospital bed wasn?t working right and they couldn?t get it fixed because they had to go off hospice in order for her to be able to get one more procedure. A catheter that would drain the fluid from her tumors, paracentesis. A procedure she?d been traveling to San Francisco to receive once a week, to relieve the pressure. She was angry, frustrated.

She?d felt so sick in the night, she was shaking, she told me. Her husband wouldn?t let her call 911. ?I was ready to let go,? she said. Whatever I said back was clearly insufficient because next she shouted at me, ?THAT?S A REALLY BIG DEAL!?

She and her husband were sleeping on the sofa bed in the meantime. The old sofa bed that she?d slipcovered, but they?d had to take the slipcover off to open it out. She wanted to know if I might help her get a new sofa bed. Would IKEA deliver?

At this point David got on the phone and asked me to please not go buy them a sofa. He?s familiar by now with my tendency to take Leila?s requests and run with them. The toilet paper, the moisturizer, the pajama pants. But I assured him I wasn?t going to buy them a sofa. He explained that 911 wasn?t an option anymore. ?Unless she breaks a limb, I have all the medications she needs here.?

I knew other friends were going to visit her that day, so off I went again into the swirl of grandparent and toddler time. On Monday when I called, she was too tired to talk. Or was that Tuesday? Yes. I?d waited till the grandparents left. A flurry of emails that day confirmed that Leila?s MFA professor and friend had offered to edit and publish her novel and Leila accepted.

On Wednesday, I went over to the house. A woman with long red hair and hazel eyes answered the door, a friend of Leila?s from almost 30 years ago, college and her New York period. Eva had flown up from L.A. for the day. Leila was asleep. Eva was cleaning out the refrigerator. Together we made a big pot of spaghetti sauce for David while he napped (Leila keeps him up at night like a newborn.) We stood in the kitchen and looked out at Leila, her sleeping face framed in the pass-through window. Eva told me: When I first met Leila, I was so in love with her. She was just so beautiful, and so fabulous. I told her I thought we would be friends forever, that we would grow old together. She looked at me in that way, (Eva mimics, creating a distance with a wave of one hand, upper torso pulling backwards) ?Don?t be so presumptuous,? she told me. But now, it?s almost come true.

When it was time for her to go back to the airport, Eva stood next to the hospital bed and talked to still-sleeping Leila, said goodbye, cried. I couldn?t hear her over the exhaust fan from the stove, but I could tell by the shape of her back what the conversation was.

I could not, have not, did not talk to Leila while she seemed out of it. I watched others do it. But I just couldn?t. For the most part.

That afternoon, I held her hand. Her skin was so dry, so I put lotion on. Each time the cold dab from the bottle touched her skin, she startled, eyes wide. I reassured her. Telling her exactly what I was doing, the same way I used to narrate diaper changes and such to Jonah when he was a newborn.

She never actually acknowledged me that day. I?m not sure she recognized me. I could tell she knew who David was, and when her mother came, I heard her say, Mom. Several times she tried to get out of bed and I tried to explain to her that she couldn?t. But it seemed impossible to explain. Her mind didn?t know the limitations of her body anymore. Eventually she?d give in and lie back down.

I talked a lot to David that day. True things we?ve been thinking and feeling. (Later, when others, Joni, one of the nurses, claimed that she could hear everything, even when we thought she wasn?t with us, wasn?t comprehending, I was grateful for the conversations I?d had with others in her presence, because we?d said things to each other I?d never gotten a chance to say to her.)

The next day, yesterday, her condition had declined even more. I got the news in an email that afternoon, that she was more out of it, that her lungs were full of fluid. I?d just been in the process of trying to organize a sign-up sheet, for those of us who wanted to visit, to keep David company with Leila. I said I?d come at 5:30. I looked around the room, trying to figure out what to do next, what to do until 5:30. I ended up grabbing some food from the fridge, to cook dinner for David and I, and walking out the door right then. I called the nanny. ?Please prepare Jonah, let him know I won?t be here when he gets home.?

I was unprepared for the sound of someone breathing through fluid. Rough, jagged, bubbling breaths. Her head would move, her mouth open wide, gulping at the air. Her eyes were slightly open, unfocused. Is she awake or asleep? I asked.

I sat down on the couch, and for the first time in her and David?s presence, I cried.

The plan for the evening was this: Joni, who?d been there all afternoon, would go home and feed her dog. David was going to go pick up the kids and take them out to dinner as soon as the nurse arrived at 5:30. The meal I?d brought to cook for David would now be for Joni. Joni would come back around 6:30, and Meg would be on her way over at 7.

These events occur: I put ointment on Leila?s hands. A special salve made from shea butter and tea tree oil, prepared by a neighbor. Joni leaves. I sit down next to Leila and meditate. We used to meditate together. Etie arrives right on schedule, David leaves.

Etie administers Leila?s medications over the next hour, by droppers: morphine, haldol, something to ease the rasping in her throat. I ask her if she thinks Leila is still with us. She says no. The body has shut down. Her eyes aren?t focusing. The only organ working now is her heart.

I tell Leila, ?Honey, I?m going to make pork chops for Joni and I in your kitchen. I hope that?s okay.?

Etie sits with me in the kitchen while I cut up apples for applesauce. Four apples from my garden. I slice each one into small pieces, making a pile of cores and peel. Etie asks me questions about Leila while I chop. I realize I am cutting very slowly. ?I think this is therapeutic,? I say. ?Leila was a really great cook,? I inform her, experimenting with the past tense while rooting through the spice cabinet, looking for cardamom, ginger. ?This meal is an homage.?

Etie asks if Leila has kids, if I have kids, tells me she has six, all grown, still back in New Zealand. ?I got divorced and I needed to live in a different country from my husband,? she says in a thick accent. She asks where Leila?s kids are. I tell her. ?In my culture,? she says, ?the kids would be with her. Everyone would be gathered around her.?

Etie goes out to the living room and sits with Leila while I eat my meal. Blackened pork chops with applesauce, fried potatoes, and salad dressed in lemon juice and cumin. Etie studies the posterboards of family photos we?d displayed at the Healing Circle event, less than two weeks ago, now placed against the wall at the head of the hospital bed. ?She was very beautiful,? she says, ?and so young.?

Joni arrives and joins me at the kitchen table. She says Leila?s breath sounds different. Worse. I can?t hear it exactly. As much as possible I?ve tuned it out, mentally turned it into the sound of a machine, rhythmic.

We talk about whether or not Meg is going to come over. It?s just 7. Did she get Joni?s email? Did she know David wasn?t going to be here but we were?

Meg arrives. She immediately starts crying, assuming that my presence in the house means Leila is already gone.

She comes in and we all hug, and then we start to putter. Do you think we should open these cards, put them out around the room? Perhaps not. The kids may come after she passes, maybe they wouldn?t want to see all the cards around. Meg, the organizer, goes through the mail, sorting out bills from the rest of the pile. Joni and I explain to Meg that David is out with the kids.

We hear a noise. What was that noise? Again.

Leila, vocalizing. A sound. A long moaning sound.

Is she in pain? No, she?d just had morphine a little bit ago. The three of us gather near her head, Etie stands near Leila?s feet, but at a distance. This is it, she tells us. Leila?s eyes focus, staring into Joni?s. I place my hands gently on Leila?s head, as I have done so many times in the last few weeks, and the last two days. I lean close to her. Meg is standing behind Joni. The bubbling in Leila?s breathing is gone. Her breaths are slower, farther apart. The three of us are all talking, crying, praying. Leila, you are so beautiful. We love you. Everything is going to be okay. Everything is okay. You did good. You did so many good things in this world. We love you. It?s okay.

?She?s gone,? says Etie.

I try closing her eyes, like they do in the movies, but the lids pop right back up. Etie explains that it takes a while. We position her head and I hold her jaw and eyelids closed while Joni and Meg start cleaning up. Joni calls David. Meg gathers all the medical gear and supplies and moves them into the garage, to make the room more hospitable, if the kids decide they want to see her.

Etie leaves. ?Tell David, he doesn?t have to pay me for tonight,? she says.

After a while, I trade places with Joni, finishing up the dishes while she holds Leila?s face. I clean out the freezer. Meals will be arriving soon. I put out dried apricots, pretzels, pine nuts, remembering that my grandmother, right before her death, had made a list of items that she?d wanted for her funeral, such as white roses and sand from Israel to be placed on the casket, and no one could figure out why she?d written ?pistachios? until finally we realized she?d meant, for the guests.

Arrivals: Her mother, David, the kids.

I call a few people to give them the news. My friend tells me of washing her father?s body after he had passed. A Jewish ritual.

The hospice nurse arrives. She says, ?In this situation, I usually offer to wash and dress the body, if you would like me to do that.?

Yes!

I choose a long turquoise middle eastern caftan with gold embroidery, the one I think she may have worn to the Healing Circle, though none of us can recall for certain. I show it to David and his eyes light up. Yes.

Joni, the nurse ? whose physical beauty, like the startling handsomeness of every doctor and nurse at the hospital, Leila would definitely have remarked upon and appreciated ? and I respectfully wash and dress Leila, put a necklace on her, cross her hands and rest them on her belly, lay a blue and white flowered coverlet over her feet.

It?s such a simple thing, and why bother, except that is possibly the one thing I am the most grateful for. That we gave Leila?s body this small dignity. Her face, the struggle removed, looked so peaceful and young. She was almost smiling.

by Julie Feinstein Adams 
Abu-Saba, Leila Elias (I5702)
 
2 Bayne Mallary, 51, Engineer

Miller Bayne Mallary, 51, died Saturday. Services and burial will be private.

Mr. Mallary, a native of Dry Branch, had attended Lanier High School in Macon and was technical manager of Engelhard Corp. in McIntyre. He was a chemical engineer, a graduate of Georgia Institute of Technology and a member of Phi Delta Theta fraternity. He was a member of Christ Episcopal Church and the holder of several patents involving kaolin processing.

Survivors include his wife, Mrs. Lester Mallary of Macon; his daughter, Miss Bessie Mallary of Macon; two sons, Miller Bayne Mallary Jr. and John H. Mallary, both of Macon; his mother, Mrs. E. Y. Mallary Jr. of Greenville, S.C.; two sisters, Mrs. Eben Taylor of Greenville, and Mrs. J. M. Willingham of Durham, N.H.; a brother, Edgar Young Mallary III of Macon; an uncle, Nelson D. Mallary of Macon; and two grandchildren.

In lieu of flowers, the family requests that contributions be made Christ Church Memorial Fund.

 
Mallary, Miller Bayne (I1153)
 
3 New York Times
Edward G. Christianson Dies; Executive of Oil Corporations
Published: July 4, 1986

Edward George Christianson, a petroleum engineer and executive of the Shell Oil Company, the Amarada-Hess and Petro-Lewis corporations, died of heart disease Saturday at Georgetown Hospital. He was 69 years old and lived in Washington, D.C.

Mr. Christianson joined Shell in 1938.

He rose to vice president for the Houston area in 1964 and to executive vice president for exploration and production in 1967. He left the company in 1970.

From 1971 to 1974 he was executive vice president of Amarada-Hess. He subsequently worked as a consultant in the petroleum industry. He was also a director of the the Petro-Lewis Corporation of Denver at the time of his death.

Mr. Christianson was born in Chicago and graaduated in 1935 from the University of Wisconsin, where he won letters in football and track. He the Big Ten shotput champion in his senior year. In 1965 he received the distinguished alumnus award from the university.

He is survived by his wife, the former Olive Bayne; two sons, George B. of Princeton, N.J., and Dr. Charles E. of Washington, D.C.; a daughter, Karen of Brooklyn Heights; and two grandchildren.

 
Christianson, Edward George (I2913)
 
4 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Womble, A.L. (I0305)
 
5 The Orlando Sentinel - Wednesday, July 3, 1996

Deceased Name: EVA M. BAYNE

90, 140 Lansing Island Drive, Indian Harbour Beach, died Tuesday, July 2. Ms. Bayne was a homemaker. Born in Pembroke, Maine, she moved to Central Florida in 1982. She was Baptist. Survivors: sister, Arline White, Vinalhaven, Maine; brother, Sherman Bennett, Hendersonville, N.C.; nieces and nephews. Brownlie & Maxwell Funeral Home, Melbourne.

Edition: CENTRAL FLORIDA
Page: D4

 
Bennett, Eva Maude (I2001)
 
6 ?We build things,? Barton Cregger once said enthusiastically, speaking of engineers and VCU?s School of Engineering .As a faculty member and associate dean, he helped build the school and hundreds of young people and their careers as well. Cregger died March 27 after a massive stroke. He was 49.

Cregger came to VCU in 1998 as an assistant professor in the Department of Electrical Engineering. He helped shape the curriculum and even the open physical layout of the new school, which incorporates areas for study and discussion in small groups?encouraging that cross-fertilization of ideas so necessary to solving problems and generating new solutions.

Cregger?s experience at Medeco Security Locks in Salem , Virginia and at Texas Instruments in Dallas meant he could help students see how to translate engineering concepts into viable business production. Hands-on practice on real projects has always driven professional training at VCU, and it?s such a major theme for the School of Engineering that the school?s newest building now under construction will be joined to a new building for VCU?s School of Business.

As associate dean, Cregger aggressively recruited a diverse student body, taking opportunity to some potential engineers who didn?t know those possibilities existed. Special open house demonstrations brought disadvantaged students to the VCU campus to taste the excitement of engineering and to awaken a hunger in them for a college education. He was the prime engine in the engineering school's FIRST Robotics competition that brings middle and high school students to campus each year.

Cregger didn?t forget them once they were here, and he followed their careers after graduation.

"Engineering students have a very difficult time. It's not unusual for students to get discouraged and want to give up,? said VCU?s dean of engineering, Dr. Russell Jamison, in the Richmond Times-Dispatch. ?Bart was the guy who helped them get through the day, who taught them to take failure and setbacks and who got them going again."

As an alumni recruiter for the school, Brad Crosby ?01BS/En says, ?We tell prospective students and families, ?You won?t be just a number at VCU,? and no one lived that more than Bart.? Students wanted to do well; they didn?t like to disappoint Bart. Crosby remembers a student intern at his firm, Qimonda, who didn?t seem to quite fit. ?Instead of just saying 'you win some and you loose some,'? Crosby says, ?Bart was committed to teaching. He asked why it wasn't working. Set up coaching sessions. He met regularly with the student?s mentor, and went much further than I ever expected anyone would. In his mind's eye there never seemed to be a lost cause?just an opportunity to teach.?

Mary Perkinson ?91BFA?03BS/En comments, ?Bart Cregger touched the lives of everyone around him in a positive way. He was always ready to give encouragement and a helping hand to every student that crossed his path. He has left a void that will be impossible to fill at Virginia Commonwealth University School of Engineering.?

Chris Wash ?04BS/En adds, ?It was Bart?s simple, genuine, and highly contagious philosophy that made the school what it is today?that no matter who you are, where you come from, or where you are going, you're always a part of the School of Engineering family. I think that's the reason most students would say Dean Cregger had a fatherly aura about him as he walked the halls and classrooms of the school, and it's also why he will be missed so dearly.?

"Bart's loss to us is immeasurable," Jamison says. "Bart's legacy of influencing young lives is one that any of us would envy."

Memorial contributions may be sent to The Barton B. Cregger Scholarship Fund at VCU School of Engineering Foundation; P.O. Box 843068; Richmond, VA 23284. 
Cregger, Barton Bentley (I5708)
 
7 Adopted by Samuel Bayne Family at about age 10 Townes, Daniel Richard (I296287)
 
8 Age 45, died Saturday in NJ; born in Hell's Kitchen, NY; dropped out of school in ninth grade; served briefly in the USN; married and divorced twice (Dianne and Lynn); self-employed as a house painter (Pearsall Painting and Decorating) in NY, NJ, and FL; fathered 2 sons (Erik and Kevin) in his second marriage; married a third time (1991), and died within 15 years of contracting HIV.

Bobby was an amazing man - in that he relished the "good" things in life; aspired to experience and enjoy all that money could buy! His association with a woman (Chris Evans) between his second and third marriages, afforded him with opportunities to pursue the world of drugs - which included heroine - to which he became addicted, later going thru rehab with methadone, relapsing to that one final injection from which he contracted HIV.

He predeceased his parents, Andrew and Dorothy Pearsall, of Hasbrouck Heights, N.J. He shares the same grave with his sister Joan, with whom he admittedly fought over, but shared drugs with, and who died from a drug overdose in 1979.

 
Pearsall, Robert Andrew (I304686)
 
9 Age 65, of Hot Springs AR, formerly of El Dorado AR, was mercifully pronounced dead (rather than put on life support) at 4:18pm Wednesday, as a result of injuries sustained as a driver in an auto accident (with his wife, and beloved canine Rufus, as passengers) at 3:35pm that day, in Hot Springs; born and raised in El Dorado AR, to Lloyd Chesney and Billie Jean Baston; graduated Louisiana Tech University with Bachelor of Science in Chemical Engineering Degree, minor in math; was a process engineer for Union Carbide, Atlantic Richfield, Crown Central Petroleum, Houston Lighting and Power Company, and Baston Oil Company of El Dorado AR; private computer consultant; licensed small aircraft pilot; FCC licensed radio operator; adjunct professor in Union, Ouachita, and Columbia Counties.

With retirement time available to him, Ben volunteered his energies and abilities to the Find A Grave website project; working carefully and diligently, to clean cemetery markers (with natural bristle brushes), and digging out those 'buried' over time, to enable him to photograph and enter those folks' names and dates at this website. He was a stickler for accuracy, and invested countless hours in pursuit of that goal. Ben's memorial page was created (pre-need) once the marker was set and photographed, three years before his demise.

Ben was predeceased by his father Lloyd C Baston and his oldest son Daniel R Baston.

Survivors include wife of six years, Lynn Cricket McClure, mother, two daughters, a son, a brother and sister, a grand daughter and another on the way, a niece, three nephews, and two previous wives, the mothers of his four children.

No funeral services were scheduled, as per Ben's wishes.

Cremation was handled by Caruth-Hale Funeral Home. Burial of cremains was Monday, April 4, 2011, at noon.

 
Baston, Bennie Pat (I304689)
 
10 Age 77; CA native; US Navy veteran; distinguished oral surgeon, retired from practices in Oakland and San Diego.

Predeceased by parents, and first wife Nancy Jean Moore.

Survived by daughter Sandi, sister Betty, grandson JJ Holter, and ex-second wife.

 
Roffinella, Dr John Phillip (I304687)
 
11 Alexander Bane, the 2nd Bane Laird of Tulloch, married twice - in 1558 and 1562. His first marriage seems to have been to Janet Dingwall, of the Dingwalls of Kildun and Ussie, by whom he had a son and heir, Duncan; and his second wife was Agnes, dau. James Fraser and niece of Hugh, 5th Lord Lovat, by whom he had eight more children. In 1562, he exchanged certain lands in Sutherland (probably part of the lands which his father had obtained from James V in 1542) with Robert Munro of Fowlis, for lands in Ross, and "for infefting him in Fowlis's arable lands in the Burgh of Dingwall." He died ca. 1599, having had issue: by his first marriage, Duncan, his successor; by his 2nd marriage: Alexander, progenitor of the Bains of Wester Logie; Ronald, Janet, Giles, John, Hugh, or Ewen, Marjory, Catherine.

He had lived in a period of stirring feuds or episodes, some of which affected the family, including:

1. The Reformation and the teaching of John Knox were beginning to have an effect on the religious thinking of the people. In 1560, the Scottish Parliament abolished the papal jurisdiction in Scotland. This was a significant step in the progress of the Reformation; but it seemed to increase the ambitions of powerful people who were waiting for chances to increase their properties; also, it resulted in great unsettlement due to the intrigues of the Royal Family in their efforts, first, to maintain the Roman system, and, later, to influence the episcopal system.

2. The Privy Council records dated Dec. 25, 1595, refer to the complaint of Alexander Bane of Tulloch and Alexander Bane, Fiar of Logie, against John Mackenzie, Minister of Urray, to the effect that the latter was accused "first, of harbouring John Macgillicum Rasa, a common thief and lummair and denounced rebel there," for the purpose of murdering the two sons of the said Alexander Bane of Logie, and, secondly, of coming to the complainant's lands of Urray and cutting "his plewis and rigwiddies," and thereby and by "utheris and like oppin and manifest oppression," laying the said lands waste. Bane of Logie appeared for himself at the appointed time, but Mackenzie failed to appear, was denounced rebel and put to the horn.

3. Alexander, a son of Alexander by his second marriage, was known as "The Younger of Tulloch" since his father also was Alexander; and was famous as "Alastair Mor Ban" because of his strength, fierceness and his savage acts, which caused his father much concern. For instance, he came to hate the Mackenzies for their acquisitive activities; and, when one of them claimed the Bane lands in Torridan, he led a band of kinsfolk to the public fair at Logie, where the whole county would gather, attacked his enemy and killed him on the spot. Another Mackenzie, who demanded satisfaction, was also struck down. These two Mackenzies were amongst the finest swordsmen of the day, so their clansmen fell upon the Banes and their friends the Munros before they could get together. Many of the Banes and thirteen of the Munros are said to have been slain, and some Mackenzies. Alastair Mor escaped and made his way to his uncle, Lord Lovat, at Beauly. Lovat seems to have sent a messenger to the King at Falkland Palace to present the Bane version of the affair; but the Mackenzies got there first, and they also burnt the Bane barns and stackyards at Lemlair, three miles east of Dingwall. The Council at Falkland gave orders for the Banes of Tulloch and the Mackenzies of Kintail to bind themselves to keep the peace.

4. In 1596, the Second Laird, claiming to be "a decrepid aged man past eighty years of age and blind," complained to the King against Kenneth Mackenzie of Kintail on another matter; and the King remitted the complaint to be decided by ordinary judges. In September, 1599, Kintail entered into a bond for a thousand merks that John Dunbar, fiar of Avoch, and others, in five hundred merks each, "will not harm Roderick Dingwall of Tulloch, Duncan Bane, heir-apparent of Tulloch, Alexander Bane of Logie," and other sons and grandsons of Bane of Tulloch.

From: THE CLAN BAIN WITH ITS ANCESTRAL AND RELATED
SCOTTISH CLANS
by
ALFRED JOHN LAWRENCE, E.D., B.Sc., M.E.I.C., P.Eng.,
President, Caledonian Society of Montreal, 1936-40
General Chairman, Scottish Games, Montreal, 1935-9
Major, R.C.E. (Retired)
 
Bane, 2nd Laird, Alexander (I0099)
 
12 Alexander Bane, the 2nd Bane Laird of Tulloch, married twice - in 1558 and 1562. His first marriage seems to have been to Janet Dingwall, of the Dingwalls of Kildun and Ussie, by whom he had a son and heir, Duncan; and his second wife was Agnes, dau. James Fraser and niece of Hugh, 5th Lord Lovat, by whom he had eight more children. In 1562, he exchanged certain lands in Sutherland (probably part of the lands which his father had obtained from James V in 1542) with Robert Munro of Fowlis, for lands in Ross, and "for infefting him in Fowlis's arable lands in the Burgh of Dingwall." He died ca. 1599, having had issue: by his first marriage, Duncan, his successor; by his 2nd marriage: Alexander, progenitor of the Bains of Wester Logie; Ronald, Janet, Giles, John, Hugh, or Ewen, Marjory, Catherine.

He had lived in a period of stirring feuds or episodes, some of which affected the family, including:

1. The Reformation and the teaching of John Knox were beginning to have an effect on the religious thinking of the people. In 1560, the Scottish Parliament abolished the papal jurisdiction in Scotland. This was a significant step in the progress of the Reformation; but it seemed to increase the ambitions of powerful people who were waiting for chances to increase their properties; also, it resulted in great unsettlement due to the intrigues of the Royal Family in their efforts, first, to maintain the Roman system, and, later, to influence the episcopal system.

2. The Privy Council records dated Dec. 25, 1595, refer to the complaint of Alexander Bane of Tulloch and Alexander Bane, Fiar of Logie, against John Mackenzie, Minister of Urray, to the effect that the latter was accused "first, of harbouring John Macgillicum Rasa, a common thief and lummair and denounced rebel there," for the purpose of murdering the two sons of the said Alexander Bane of Logie, and, secondly, of coming to the complainant's lands of Urray and cutting "his plewis and rigwiddies," and thereby and by "utheris and like oppin and manifest oppression," laying the said lands waste. Bane of Logie appeared for himself at the appointed time, but Mackenzie failed to appear, was denounced rebel and put to the horn.

3. Alexander, a son of Alexander by his second marriage, was known as "The Younger of Tulloch" since his father also was Alexander; and was famous as "Alastair Mor Ban" because of his strength, fierceness and his savage acts, which caused his father much concern. For instance, he came to hate the Mackenzies for their acquisitive activities; and, when one of them claimed the Bane lands in Torridan, he led a band of kinsfolk to the public fair at Logie, where the whole county would gather, attacked his enemy and killed him on the spot. Another Mackenzie, who demanded satisfaction, was also struck down. These two Mackenzies were amongst the finest swordsmen of the day, so their clansmen fell upon the Banes and their friends the Munros before they could get together. Many of the Banes and thirteen of the Munros are said to have been slain, and some Mackenzies. Alastair Mor escaped and made his way to his uncle, Lord Lovat, at Beauly. Lovat seems to have sent a messenger to the King at Falkland Palace to present the Bane version of the affair; but the Mackenzies got there first, and they also burnt the Bane barns and stackyards at Lemlair, three miles east of Dingwall. The Council at Falkland gave orders for the Banes of Tulloch and the Mackenzies of Kintail to bind themselves to keep the peace.

4. In 1596, the Second Laird, claiming to be "a decrepid aged man past eighty years of age and blind," complained to the King against Kenneth Mackenzie of Kintail on another matter; and the King remitted the complaint to be decided by ordinary judges. In September, 1599, Kintail entered into a bond for a thousand merks that John Dunbar, fiar of Avoch, and others, in five hundred merks each, "will not harm Roderick Dingwall of Tulloch, Duncan Bane, heir-apparent of Tulloch, Alexander Bane of Logie," and other sons and grandsons of Bane of Tulloch.

From: THE CLAN BAIN WITH ITS ANCESTRAL AND RELATED
SCOTTISH CLANS
by
ALFRED JOHN LAWRENCE, E.D., B.Sc., M.E.I.C., P.Eng.,
President, Caledonian Society of Montreal, 1936-40
General Chairman, Scottish Games, Montreal, 1935-9
Major, R.C.E. (Retired)
 
Bane, 2nd Laird, Alexander (I0099)
 
13 April 27, 2011
Aunt Bib, you were always so kind to your niece and all your nephews. We're so sad to see you leave us -- but you're now in heaven with your brothers and sisters. Thanks for being a wonderful and gracious aunt!
~? Michael, Brenda and Marinda Martin, Bonaire, Georgia

April 27, 2011
We had the pleasure of knowing Bib through her special friendship with Winnie, my sister. She was indeed special, talented and loved by many. She will be missed here but we pray that Winnie, Bib's family and host of friends find peace in knowing she is now rejoicing in the arms of Jesus.
~? Joe and Katha Twiner, Valdosta, Georgia

April 27, 2011
I know that Bib will be missed by many. She was such a speical friend to my sister, Winnie. They loved each other very much. I had the pleasure of meeting her once and she was such a lovely lady. I know she will be missed by all that knew her. My prayers go out to her family and to Winnie.
~? Wanda Twiner, Gulfport, Mississippi

April 27, 2011
It was always a pleasure knowing Bibb. We first met in 2000, in our unusual art class held every Tuesday in Old Homosassa. She had been with our teacher, artist professional Bea Davis for many years before we met. Always friendly and very insdustrious as a painter. She had the intelligence and abilities equal to others in the class. She'll be missed by all those in her art class. She'll be missed! Hopefully Betty Sites who supplied Bibb's transportation to and from class for some time, will visit us frequently.
~? George Harbin, Homosassa, Florida

April 27, 2011
I knew Bib through visiting my sister, Winnie, over the years. We would usually have lunch together when I was there visiting. She was a wonderful lady and great friend to my sister. I know she will be missed by her family and friends. I know I will also miss her when I visit Winnie in Florida.
~? Nancy Hatcher, Port Gibson, Mississippi

April 28, 2011
I loved Bib with all my heart. I smile every time I think of her. She had such a quick wit and always kept me laughing. We spent many wonderful hours together. I will always keep her in my heart, where she has been from the moment I met her. She was such a "Southern Belle" and a fine example of how a person should behave. I will never forget one of the first times we went to lunch and she was taking some home with her. She was putting the food one spoonful at a time in the takeout container. I said, "Just dump it, Bib." She said, "That wouldn't be genteel." Oh, how I will miss her. I wake up every morning thinking of her, and go to sleep every night thinking of her. What a fine example of a lady she was.
~? Winnie Biddleman, Beverly Hills, Florida

 
Bayne, Harriet Elizabeth (I1001)
 
14 Arthur Leapard MARTIN had his name legally changed to Arthur Stephen MARTIN.
He was an electrical engineer by training having gone to the University of Florida for 3-1/2 years without graduating. He would have been in the class of 1939.

He served in the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers during World War II in New Guinea. After the war he was employed by Tropical Oil Company in Colombia, South America; City of West Palm Beach as assistant city engineer; Palm Beach Air Force Base as base civil engineer; Banana River Naval Air Station (now Patrick Air Force Base); Gee & Jenson Consulting Engineers; Boeing Company at Cape Canaveral and New Orleans where he worked on the Minuteman missile and Saturn V projects; and Bechtel Corp where he worked as a Quality Engineer on nuclear power plant projects.

He had an avid interest in boating (predominately sail boats and houseboats). This probably stemmed from his youth when he lived on a houseboat in Miami and he helped his grandfather deliver the U.S. Mail by boat in South Florida from West Palm Beach to Lake Okeechobee. 
Martin, Arthur (Leapard) Stephen (I3334)
 
15 Arthur Stephen Martin, 71, 2909 Matthew Drive, Rockledge, died Friday. Born in Jacksonville, he moved to Rockledge from West Palm Beach in 1961. He was a retired civil engineer and was an Episcopalian. He was a member of Indian River Yacht Club and Mensa Club. Survivors: wife, Frances; sons, Michael, Georgia, Christopher, Merritt Island, R. Craig, Houston, Jonathan, Rockledge. Wylie-Baxley Funeral Home, Rockledge.
From the Orlando Sentinel, 24 Nov 1985

 
Martin, Arthur (Leapard) Stephen (I3334)
 
16 Baldwin County 1864 Census for Re-organizing the Georgia Militia
20th Senatorial District, 320th Militia District
BAYNE, A.F., 27 yrs, Card Maker, employed in Pioneer Card Factory, b. GA
 
Bayne, Adolphus Francis (I5334)
 
17 Barton Bentley Cregger, 49, of Powhatan (Richmond), Va. and formerly of Roanoke, Va., passed away Tuesday, March 27, 2007, at the VCU Medical Center.

Bart was Associate Dean of the School of Engineering at Virginia Commonwealth University in Richmond. Bart joined VCU in 1998 and was key to shaping the future of the School of Engineering. Prior to joining VCU, Bart held engineering and business roles at several technology companies, including Medeco Security Locks in Salem, Va., and Texas Instruments in Dallas, Texas. He was a Master Mason of Melrose Masonic Lodge of Roanoke, Va.

Bart was a loving and devoted husband, son, brother and stepfather, and was much admired by his friends, students, colleagues and associates.

Born March 14, 1958, in Roanoke, Bart graduated from William Fleming High School in Roanoke in 1976, from the University of Virginia with his bachelor's degree in 1980 and master's degree in electrical engineering in 1982.

Bart was preceded in death by his father, Frank Albert Cregger, in October 2006.

Bart is survived by his wife, the love of his life, Norma Bond Cregger; mother, Susan Bentley Cregger, of Roanoke; sister and brother-in-law Stephanie and Steven Reger, of Sterling, Va.; stepdaughter and her husband, Julia and Michael Atalla, of Bellevue, Wash.; aunts and uncles, Edna and Lewis Clark, June Cregger Lucas, Geraldine Prather Cregger, all of Roanoke; Joan Bentley Hoelzer, of Virginia Beach, Va.; Bayne Bentley and Mary Abu-Saba, of California; Edward and Virginia Bentley, of Texas, and many cousins; father-inlaw and his wife, Royal and Pat Bond, of Radford, Va.; brothersin-law and their wives, Edward and Marsha Bond, of Georgia, Steven and Ginger Bond, of North Carolina, and Roy Lee and Chom Bond, of Dublin, Va.; sisters-in-law and their husbands, Sandra and Horace Copeland, of Williamsburg, Va., Bonita and Russell Johnston, of Troutville, Va.; also a special godson, Boone Yandle, of North Carolina.

Funeral services will be held on Saturday, March 31 at 2 p.m. at Oakey's North Chapel on Peters Creek Road, with the Rev. Russell Cheatham officiating. Interment will follow at Blue Ridge Memorial Gardens with Masonic Rites by Melrose Masonic Lodge. The family will receive visitors on Friday, March 30, 2007, from 2 to 4 p.m. and 7 to 9 p.m. at Oakey's North Chapel, 6732 Peters Creek Road, Roanoke.

In lieu of flowers, the family requests memorial contributions be sent to The Barton B. Cregger Scholarship Fund, in care of VCU School of Engineering Foundation, P.O. Box 843068, Richmond, Va. 23284. Arrangements are by Oakey's North Chapel and Crematory, 540-362-1237.

Published in the Roanoke Times from 3/28/2007 - 3/31/2007.

 
Cregger, Barton Bentley (I5708)
 
18 Bayne, Hendley V.- private September 26, 1861. Wounded. Captured at Wilderness, Va. May 6, 1864. Released at Elmira, N. Y. June 19, 1865.
 
Bayne, Henley Varner (I2549)
 
19 BAYNE, MORRIS SINGLETON ""BUD: Newspaper Obituary and Death Notice
St. Petersburg Times (FL) - Friday, January 24, 1997

Deceased Name: BAYNE, MORRIS SINGLETON ""BUD
BAYNE, MORRIS SINGLETON ""BUD,'' 85, of Homosassa, died Tuesday (Jan. 21, 1997) at Crystal River Healthcare and Rehab. Born in Macon, Ga., he came here 20 years ago from West Palm Beach. He was a retired surveyor for U. S. Engineers and a member of St. Anne's Episcopal Church, Crystal River. He was a Navy veteran of World War II.

Survivors include two sisters, Elizabeth H. Bayne, Homosassa, and Mary Bayne Sites, Alachua.

Wilder-Fountains Funeral Home, Homosassa Springs.

 
Bayne, Morris Singleton (I0779)
 
20 Blanche Nelson Mallary Willingham

MACON, GA- Blanche Nelson Mallary Willingham passed away on Tuesday, June 16, 2015 in Jefferson, Georgia.

Born July 2, 1929, in Dry Branch, Georgia, Blanche grew up in Macon, Georgia. She was the daughter of Edgar Young and Martha Bayne Mallary. Blanche graduated from Washington Seminary in Atlanta and attended Mercer University where she was a member of Phi Mu sorority as well as a Phil Delt sweetheart. She graduated from the University of Georgia with a degree in Early Childhood Education.

Blanche was preceded in death by her brothers and sister, Edgar Young Mallary, III, Miller Bayne Mallary, and Martha Mallary Taylor.

Blanche was a charter member of the Junior League of Macon. In addition, she was a past member of Idle Hour Golf and Country Club, Macon Garden Club and Macon Civic Club. She grew up in the First Baptist Church in Macon and attended Ingleside Baptist Church. She was a member of the Lookout Mountain Baptist Church on Lookout Mountain, Tennessee.

Blanche's love and grace will be remembered by her husband of sixty three years, Mickey Willingham. In addition, she is survived by her daughters and son, Mary Emily Vezina (Mike) of Nashville, Tennessee, Mallary Veale of Watkinsville, Georgia, and Jay Willingham, Jr. (Evy) of Macon; grandchildren, Matthew Vezina, Michael Vezina, Emily Vezina, Mac Veale, Katherine Veale, Allison Letson (Corey), and Calder Willingham (Jennifer); and great-grandchildren, Zoey Willingham, and Nora Willingham.

A funeral service will be held at 11:00AM on Saturday, June 20, 2015 in the chapel of Hart's at the Cupola, 6324 Peake Road, with the Reverend Anne Merony officiating. There will be a visitation one hour before the service for friends and family. Burial will be private for family only.

In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the American Cancer Society, 804 Cherry Street, Macon, Georgia 31201.

Hart's Mortuary at the Cupola has charge of arrangements.

 
Mallary, Blanche (I1152)
 
21 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Martin, M.S. (I0001)
 
22 Buried: Clinton Methodist Church Cemetery, Clinton, GA - Lot 29, Person 13 Bowen, Eliza Williams (I1642)
 
23 Buried: Memory Hill Cemetery, Milledgeville, GA - East side, Section F, Lot 11, Person 1 Bayne, Edward Arnold (I1372)
 
24 Buried: Memory Hill Cemetery, Milledgeville, GA - East side, Section F, Lot 11, Person 2 Godard, Fannie (I1438)
 
25 Buried: Memory Hill Cemetery, Milledgeville, GA - East side, Section F, Lot 3, Person 3

Unmarked adult slab as of 1998.
w/o Adolphus Bayne, per or according to the 1938 Allen/Andrews Directory, compiled and written by Sally (Sarah) Cantey Whitaker Allen (1865-1942), with the assistance of Louis H. Andrews (1866-1944). This directory is a limited production, self-copied book containing the first major indexing of the cemetery. It is presumed that much of the information contained in the book was provided to its authors through first-hand experience or family members. Copies of this book may be found in the City of Milledgeville's City Engineer's Office, the Mary Vinson Library of Milledgeville, and the Baldwin County Courthouse.
 
Jenkins, Mary J. (I5997)
 
26 Buried: Memory Hill Cemetery, Milledgeville, GA - East side, Section F, Lot 3, Person 4

Military Service: Confederate States of America
State Troops 
Bayne, Adolphus Francis (I5334)
 
27 Buried: Memory Hill Cemetery, Milledgeville, GA - East side, Section F, Lot 3, Person 6

Second w/o Adolphus Bayne, per or according to the 1938 Allen/Andrews Directory, compiled and written by Sally (Sarah) Cantey Whitaker Allen (1865-1942), with the assistance of Louis H. Andrews (1866-1944). This directory is a limited production, self-copied book containing the first major indexing of the cemetery. It is presumed that much of the information contained in the book was provided to its authors through first-hand experience or family members. Copies of this book may be found in the City of Milledgeville's City Engineer's Office, the Mary Vinson Library of Milledgeville, and the Baldwin County Courthouse. 
Singleton, Elizabeth H. (I5381)
 
28 Buried: Memory Hill Cemetery, Milledgeville, GA - East side, Section F, Lot 3, Person 7

Unmarked adult slab as of 1998.
d/o Adolphus Bayne, per or according to the 1938 Allen/Andrews Directory, compiled and written by Sally (Sarah) Cantey Whitaker Allen (1865-1942), with the assistance of Louis H. Andrews (1866-1944). This directory is a limited production, self-copied book containing the first major indexing of the cemetery. It is presumed that much of the information contained in the book was provided to its authors through first-hand experience or family members. Copies of this book may be found in the City of Milledgeville's City Engineer's Office, the Mary Vinson Library of Milledgeville, and the Baldwin County Courthouse. 
Bayne, Mary Ellen (I5460)
 
29 Buried: Memory Hill Cemetery, Milledgeville, GA - East side, Section H, Lot 18, Person 1

Inscription and Notes:
s/o James and Hester Singleton, b. Putnam Co
GA, d. in Eatonton 
Singleton, Samuel Medlock (I5504)
 
30 Buried: Memory Hill Cemetery, Milledgeville, GA - East side, Section H, Lot 18, Person 4

Inscription and Notes:
Unmarked grave as of 1998.
s/o Samuel & Ann C. Singleton, per or according to the 1938 Allen/Andrews Directory, compiled and written by Sally (Sarah) Cantey Whitaker Allen (1865-1942), with the assistance of Louis H. Andrews (1866-1944). This directory is a limited production, self-copied book containing the first major indexing of the cemetery. It is presumed that much of the information contained in the book was provided to its authors through first-hand experience or family members. Copies of this book may be found in the City of Milledgeville's City Engineer's Office, the Mary Vinson Library of Milledgeville, and the Baldwin County Courthouse. 
Singleton, John (I6766)
 
31 Buried: Memory Hill Cemetery, Milledgeville, GA - East side, Section H, Lot 18, Person 5

Inscription and Notes:
Unmarked child slab as of 1998.
s/o Samuel & Anne Christian Singleton
per or according to the 1938 Allen/Andrews Directory, compiled and written by Sally (Sarah) Cantey Whitaker Allen (1865-1942), with the assistance of Louis H. Andrews (1866-1944). This directory is a limited production, self-copied book containing the first major indexing of the cemetery. It is presumed that much of the information contained in the book was provided to its authors through first-hand experience or family members. Copies of this book may be found in the City of Milledgeville's City Engineer's Office, the Mary Vinson Library of Milledgeville, and the Baldwin County Courthouse. 
Singleton, Earnest Ashley (I6765)
 
32 Buried: Memory Hill Cemetery, Milledgeville, GA - West side, Section H, Lot 12, Person 3

Military Service: Confederate States of America
Co. F., 6th GA 
Bayne, Charles Thomas (I0513)
 
33 Buried: Memory Hill Cemetery, Milledgeville, GA - West side, Section H, Lot 19, Person 2 Bayne, Elizabeth (I1371)
 
34 Buried: Memory Hill Cemetery, Milledgeville, GA - West side, Section H, Lot 19, Person 3

Military Service: Confederate States of America
Co.H.,4th Ga. Wound-Sharpsburg, per RCSG

The below is from Anne J. Bailey and Walter J. Fraser, Jr.'s book entitled, Portraits of Conflict: A Photographic History of Georgia in the Civil War, Fayetteville: University of Arkansas, 1996, which is a very nice book with pictures and short biographical sketches of several people buried in Memory Hill Cemetery.

"Jacob Caraker, who had been captain of the guard at the Georgia State Penitentiary before the Civil War, joined the Baldwin Blues as 1st lieutenant in April 1861. The Blues eventually became Company H, 4th Georgia Infantry. Caraker was elected captain of his company when George Doles, who previously held that rank, became regimental colonel. Caraker commanded his men when Lee began his offensive; the captain's first fight was on June 25, 1862, at King's School House. The 4th Georgia lost almost 50 men there and suffered approximately one hundred additional casualties seven days later on the slopes of Malvern Hill. Caraker survived both battles, but was later wounded at Sharpsburg and resigned from service on February 3, 1863."
 
Caraker, Jacob Monroe (I1390)
 
35 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Martin, M.L. (I2223)
 
36 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Pressel, A.F. (I298645)
 
37 California Death Index, 1940-1997 about Gertrude Caroline Bayne
Name: Gertrude Caroline Bayne
[Gertrude Caroline Fietzer]
Social Security #: 340147814
Sex: Female
Birth Date: 13 Jul 1921
Birthplace: Wisconsin
Death Date: 13 Dec 1980
Death Place: Kern
Mother's Maiden Name: Janske
Father's Surname: Fietzer

 
Fietzer, Gerturde Caroline (I7551)
 
38 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Martin, C.F. (I5392)
 
39 Claire Slicer

Family-Placed Death Notice

SLICER, Claire Claire Bayne Slicer of Sandy Springs passed away peacefully January 8, 2009 at St. Mary's Hospice House in Bogart, GA. "Mimi" was a beloved mother and cherished grandmother with many friends in Georgia, Florida, and California. Survivors include children, Claire Calhoun of Jefferson, Crisler Calhoun (Magi) of Fort Worth, TX, Kelly Laramore (James) of Allen, TX, Molly Clarke of Brunswick, GA, and Harry L. Slicer, Jr. (Londa) of Jacksonville, FL; 13 grandchildren and 9 great-grandchildren. In lieu of flowers, the family requests that donations be made to the St. Mary's Hospice House, 1660 Jennings Mill Rd, Bogart, GA 30622. Bernstein Funeral Home is in charge of arrangements. www.bernsteinfuneralhome.com

 
Bayne, Claire Weaver (I1181)
 
40 Corporal, 5th Company, Spotswood’s 2nd Virginia Regiment, Revolutionary War Hicks, John James (I57)
 
41 Cremated

 
Bayne, Claire Weaver (I1181)
 
42 Death of Mrs. Elizabeth Bayne

Mrs. Elizabeth Singleton Bayne passed away at her home in Vineville, Macon, last Sunday afternoon at five o'clock.

Mrs. Bayne was only ill two days. Five years ago she received serious injurious in a railroad accident, which caused her much suffering and was no doubt the indirect cause of her death. For the past nine years she has resided with her son, Mr. Samuel E. Bayne, in Macon. She was 56 years of age, and leaves two sons and two daughters, and a stepson, Mr. J. M. Bayne, of this city, and a large circle of relatives and friends, by whom she was greatly beloved.

Mrs. Bayne was a native of this city, and has a large number of life-long friends here. She was the daughter of the late Mr. Samuel Singleton, and widow of the late A. F. Bayne. Her remains were brought to this city yesterday. The funeral services were held at the Methodist church, of which she was a devoted member during her residence here. The funeral services were conducted by the pastor, Rev. J. H. Mashburn. Her remains were followed to the grave by a large concourse of sorrowing friends, and laid to rest in the family lot, by the side of husband and other kindred, who preceded her to the spirit land.

She was an excellent woman in all the relations of life.

Union - Recorder, Milledgeville, Ga., May 7, 1901

 
Singleton, Elizabeth H. (I5381)
 
43 Died of typhoid fever at home.

 
Bryan, David Clement (I302116)
 
44 Dorris Windham Hardberger
THIBODAUX - Services for Mrs Dorris Windham Hardberger of Thibodaux will be held at 10 a.m. Friday, Oct, 25, in Thibodaux Methodist Church in Thibodayx. Graveside services will be held at 11:00 a.m. Saturday Oct. 26 in Blanchard Cemetery in Blanchard under the direction of Rose-Neath's Marshall Street Chapel.

Mrs. Hardberger born in Blanchard the daughter of the late T.J. and Winnette Barnes Windham, died Oct. 24, 1985, at her residence following a long illness. She was a graduate of Mooringsport High School, Northwestern State University, and the Univeristy of Alabama. Mrs. Hardberger was a longtime teacher and librarian in Caddo and Lafourche Parish.

She is survived by her husband, Max Hardberger of Thibodaux; two sons, Max Hardberger, Jr. and Karl Hardberger; one daughter, Dotty Hardberger; all of Thibodaux; rwo sisters, Dr. Allie Bayne Webb of Baton Rouge and Wyolene Windham of Blanchard; one bvrother, Noble Windham of Edwards, Miss.; one grand-daughter, Karla Hardberger; and a number of nieces and nephews.

Memorials may be made to the F. Max Hardberger Scholarship Fund, Dept. of Biology, Nickolls State University, Attn: Dr. John Green, Thibodaux, LA 71310 or to the Blanchard Cemetery Assoc.

 
Windham, Dorris Mildred (I0301)
 
45 Dr. Elias Georges Abu-Saba Passed away on September 28, 2006, after a brief battle with cancer. Friends and family had gathered together the previous weekend to celebrate Elias' life, where he read his own poetry, thanking family and friends who have graced his life. Born in the Lebanese village, Mia-Mia, in 1929 to Georges Abu-Saba and Sabat Saikaly, Elias grew up tending livestock, olives and citrus orchards on the family farm with 10 siblings. He attended Girard Institute and the American University of Beirut, (BS degree 1956), both established by the Presbyterian Church USA. He received his MS in civil engineering (1959) and Ph. D. (1969) from Virginia Polytechnic Institute. While at VPI, he met Mary Edith Bentley, a student from Randolph-Macon Woman's College where they were married in 1961. Employed as a structural engineer with Dalmo Victor Engineering Company in San Mateo, Elias then became a professor at the King Saud University in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. He won the Clarence Prouty Shedd Fellowship to study at the Pacific School of Religion in Berkeley, 1964-65, pursuing his passion for contemplation and debate of philosophy, ethics and politics. Elias was always poet and engineer, translating visions into words and soaring structures. He wrote volumes of verse and built everything from houses to space station solar panels. After teaching and consulting at Bucknell University and Bradley University he became full professor at North Carolina A&T State University in 1975, where he taught for two decades, contributing to engineering research and authoring the textbook, The Design of Steel Structures. Working for peace in the Middle East among all peoples was Elias' avocation. He leaves us with love, memories and thousands of poems that remind us there is hope. Dr. Abu-Saba is survived by his wife, Dr. Mary Bentley Abu-Saba; daughter, Leila Abu-Saba MacLeod; son, Dr. Khalil Abu-Saba; son-in-law, David MacLeod; daughter-in-law, Sarah Phelan Abu-Saba; three grandchildren, Cyrus, Joseph and Jacob; two step-grandchildren, Rachel and Tony; two brothers; one sister and myriad family members. To contribute to the progress of cancer cure, his body has been lovingly donated to the UCSF School of Medicine. Memorial Service is at 4 pm, Sunday Oct. 8, Buena Vista United Methodist Church, 2311 Buena Vista Ave, Alameda, CA. In lieu of flowers, donations to the American Cancer Society are appreciated.

This article appeared on page Z - 99 of the San Francisco Chronicle on Thursday, October 5, 2006 
Abu-Saba, Elias Georges (I5705)
 
46 Druggist Bayne, Samuel Ernest (I5462)
 
47 Druggist Bayne, Edward Stuart (I0446)
 
48 Duncan Bane became the 1st Bane "Laird of Tulloch." He married in 1512 and received from his mother some property at Tulloch. His wife was a daughter of Hector Roy Mackenzie, the 1st of Gairloch, through whom also he probably received some property. In 1542, King James V granted him some further lands in Tulloch and elsewhere which had belonged to his great-uncle, Farquhar Oure, whose son and previous heir had died; this apparently included Tulloch Castle. In 1553, the adjoining lands of Davochcarte (the present Dochcarty), were obtained from the Munros. He died ca. 1559, leaving issue:

Alexander, b. ca. 1515, his successor; two younger sons, John and William; a natural son, Ronald, b. ca. 1518; two daughters.

Duncan's brother, William, was taken by his employer to Papigo; met a girl named Mariot; went back to Papigo later, got work there, married her, and a son, William, was born about 1528. He died ca. 1538, and his widow married Hugh Groat in 1540. At the same time, Hugh and Mariota Bane, his spouse, granted by charter to young William Bane in Papigo the whole of the field called Stemster.

From: THE CLAN BAIN WITH ITS ANCESTRAL AND RELATED
SCOTTISH CLANS
by
ALFRED JOHN LAWRENCE, E.D., B.Sc., M.E.I.C., P.Eng.,
President, Caledonian Society of Montreal, 1936-40
General Chairman, Scottish Games, Montreal, 1935-9
Major, R.C.E. (Retired)
 
Bane, Laird of Tulloch, Duncan (I0101)
 
49 Duncan Bane became the 1st Bane "Laird of Tulloch." He married in 1512 and received from his mother some property at Tulloch. His wife was a daughter of Hector Roy Mackenzie, the 1st of Gairloch, through whom also he probably received some property. In 1542, King James V granted him some further lands in Tulloch and elsewhere which had belonged to his great-uncle, Farquhar Oure, whose son and previous heir had died; this apparently included Tulloch Castle. In 1553, the adjoining lands of Davochcarte (the present Dochcarty), were obtained from the Munros. He died ca. 1559, leaving issue:

Alexander, b. ca. 1515, his successor; two younger sons, John and William; a natural son, Ronald, b. ca. 1518; two daughters.

Duncan's brother, William, was taken by his employer to Papigo; met a girl named Mariot; went back to Papigo later, got work there, married her, and a son, William, was born about 1528. He died ca. 1538, and his widow married Hugh Groat in 1540. At the same time, Hugh and Mariota Bane, his spouse, granted by charter to young William Bane in Papigo the whole of the field called Stemster.

From: THE CLAN BAIN WITH ITS ANCESTRAL AND RELATED
SCOTTISH CLANS
by
ALFRED JOHN LAWRENCE, E.D., B.Sc., M.E.I.C., P.Eng.,
President, Caledonian Society of Montreal, 1936-40
General Chairman, Scottish Games, Montreal, 1935-9
Major, R.C.E. (Retired)
 
Bane, Laird of Tulloch, Duncan (I0101)
 
50 Duncan Bane, eldest son of the Fourth Laird, married Catherine, dau. Alexander Mackenzie of Kilcoy, ca. 1637; and died ca. 1649, before his father, leaving issue:

(Sir) Donald, b. ca. 1640; became the 5th Laird.

John, b. ca. 1643; m. Elspet Mackenzie; a son "David" b. 1685.

Henry, m. Mgt. Murray; was Baillie in 1674.

From: THE CLAN BAIN WITH ITS ANCESTRAL AND RELATED
SCOTTISH CLANS
by
ALFRED JOHN LAWRENCE, E.D., B.Sc., M.E.I.C., P.Eng.,
President, Caledonian Society of Montreal, 1936-40
General Chairman, Scottish Games, Montreal, 1935-9
Major, R.C.E. (Retired)

 
Bane, Duncan (I2897)
 

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